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Top view of pork fried rice on a plate with fork, spoon, cucumber, and Sriracha sauce.

Spicy Thai Pork Fried Rice

5 from 1 reviews

This Spicy Thai Pork Fried Rice is easy to make in 30 minutes with everyday ingredients and Asian pantry staples, and tastes a million times better than takeout!

Scale

Ingredients

For the Pork Marinade:

For the Sauce:

For the Spicy Thai Pork Fried Rice:

Instructions

Prep:

  1. Marinate the pork: Thinly slice the pork fillet and add the pieces to a medium bowl. Add the light soy sauce, fish sauce, and ground white pepper and mix well to coat. Set aside.
  2. Prepare the fresh ingredients: Roughly chop the garlic, red and green Bird’s Eye chilies, and halve the Prik Kee Nu green chilies (if using). Use a mortar and pestle to pound them into a coarse paste. Thinly slice the large red chili at an angle (deeseed if desired), chop the onion and spring onion, and rinse and drain the mung bean sprouts. Lightly beat the egg in a small bowl. Set everything aside.
  3. Make the sauce: Whisk together the light soy sauce, fish sauce, sweet dark soy sauce, white sugar, and sesame oil in a measuring cup or small bowl until combined well.

For the Spicy Thai Pork Fried Rice:

  1. Cook the pork: Heat 1 tablespoon of canola oil in a large wok (or frying pan) over high heat. Once hot, add the pork and spread the pieces out in the wok. Allow to sear for 1 minute, then stir-fry for another 1-2 minutes or until just cooked. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a clean bowl and set aside. Discard any liquid in the wok and wipe it out with a paper towel.
  2. Sauté onion and garlic chili paste: Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil in the wok over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the onion and sauté until softened and starting to brown – about 1-2 minutes. Add the garlic chili paste and sliced large red chili and stir-fry for minute until fragrant.
  3. Add the rice and sauce: Add the rice and pour the sauce on top. Stir-fry to combine, breaking up the clumps with your spatula, until everything is coated in the sauce.
  4. Add the white pepper and pork: Season with the ground white pepper and add the cooked pork back into the wok. Toss to combine.
  5. Cook the egg: Push everything to the side of the wok and pour in the egg. Allow to set for 20-30 seconds, then break it up into pieces and toss to combine with everything else.
  6. Add the veggies: Add the mung bean sprouts and spring onion. Toss for 30 seconds to combine, and until the bean sprouts have slightly softened. Then switch off the heat.
  7. To Serve: Divide the fried rice evenly onto plates. Serve with cucumber slices and Sriraja Panich Hot Sauce, or Prik Nam Pla (fish sauce with chopped chilies) if desired.

Notes

Ingredient Notes, Cook’s Tips, FAQs

  1. Chilies: Feel free to use as many or as few Bird’s Eye and Thai Prik Kee Nu green chilies as you like depending on your heat level preference. The Prik Kee Nu chilies may be harder to come across and are fiery hot, hence they are listed as optional for this dish. The large red chili is rather mild, and it can be substituted with sliced red bell pepper if unavailable.
  2. How to make rice for fried rice: If you don’t have cold day old rice on hand, cook the rice as you normally would (for me that’s in a rice cooker) and then spread it out in a large dish or baking tray. Place the tray, uncovered, in the fridge for at least 30 minutes (or longer if possible) so that it loses some of its moisture. The dryer the rice is, the less likely it will become mushy in the wok when you make the fried rice.
  3. How long will it keep? This fried rice tastes best on the day of making it even if you make it early in the day and reheat it in the microwave at night. Having said that, it’ll keep in a sealed airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days.
  4. How to reheat it: Reheat for 2-3 minutes on high in the microwave, stirring once in between, until hot throughout.
  5. See ‘Variations’ section above for tips on customizing this fried rice.

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Nutrition

The nutritional information provided is approximate and can vary based on several factors. It should only be used as a general guideline. For more information, please see our Disclosure.